MS and Working from Home: Dream or Dread?

“If I told you I’ve worked hard to get where I’m at, I’d be lying, because I have no idea where I am right now.”
― Jarod Kintz, This Book is Not for Sale

Working from home – isn’t that the ultimate dream? When you have an illness like MS, that dream often comes with a hard edge. Not everyone is able to be an entrepreneur, and so working from home can become a challenge.

I consider myself very fortunate that I work for an organization that is open to options like working from home, especially for people with health challenges like mine. That being said, it is not always wine and roses! But it can and does work well, and allows me to retain a standard of quality of life that I treasure.

When my MS took me to a point where I could no longer do my shift-working job, I went to day work. I was lucky – I ended up in my dream job as a “front-lines” severe weather specialist dealing with various clients. Then, when my MS developed more complications, I had to leave my dream job  and began working from home. While I have always managed to find my work interesting – I know that I had to give up a part of me by leaving that dream job behind. There’s one edge.

Working from home is not for everybody. You have to consider your personal work habits and abilities. Some questions you have to consider are:

  • Does your job allow for an option of working from home? What adaptations could be nade to allow it? (For example – if you drive a truck for a living, continuing that from home is not possible. Is there another role you could play?)
  • Does it make sense for you to work from home? Or is your health situation indicating that not working is the best option? (There are a lot of things that need to go into determining that!)
  • Do you like working alone? Or do you need regular face-to-face interaction with people?
  • Are you disciplined enough to work from home? Or do you end up getting distracted from your work by kids, pets, household chores?
  • What are the benefits of working from home for you and for your manager?
  • Do you have the space/ability to work from home? What is needed? What is your company’s policy around that?

These are just a very few of the types of questions you need to ask yourself. Each situation is unique and will need thorough research and investigation for your own personal needs.

You have to be willing to address (or ignore) strange responses – even hostile reaction from colleagues. Since beginning to work from home, I have faced questions and comments such as:

  • “Oh – you are still here! I thought you had died.”
  • “Who are you sleeping with to get such perks like working from home?”
  • “You are so lucky! I wish I had MS too if I could get to work from home!”

Wow, eh? None of it was maliciously intended…but it sure comes across negatively, eh? Another hard edge.

For me, I find it interesting that there have been so many ups and downs over the 3-4 years that I have been working almost full-time from home. I am inherently an extrovert, and I thrive in an environment where I get to interact with people directly, not just over the phone, but face to face. After my seizures began, I worked from home full time (M-F) but I found myself going a bit batty – I need interaction with people. And for professional purposes, it is always helpful for people to actually see you – otherwise you can kinda get “forgotten”. The “Outta sight, outta mind” mentality easily develops in colleagues and managers alike! I now go into the office 1-2 times per week (even though it does fatigue me greatly) in order to maintain strong professional connections and give myself that boost of interacting with people directly. (Hallway chats go a long way to help one feel connected!)

Working on your own can be a challenge for some in terms of getting work done. What I myself find is that I am actually way more productive working from home than at the office. There are fewer distractions for me, and I can focus and complete things more easily. Sometimes, if I have had a really difficult night or day, I can sleep right up to 8AM and start working the moment I wake up. If I am having a symptom flare-up, I can rest or nap, then approach my work again once rested – with a clearer head and much higher productivity: win-win for me and my manager. I have also developed a very open and honest relationship with my managers that allows for this success. (And I even get to wear my jammies all day if I wanted to!!)

Working from home is a not always a choice – but if it is an option for you, it needs significant thought and work ta actually make it successful. It needs honesty, trust, and a willingness on both sides (yours and your managers) to make it a successful arrangement. It takes teamwork.

“Working from home meant we could vary snack and coffee breaks, change our desks or view, goof off, drink on the job, even spend the day in pajamas, and often meet to gossip or share ideas. On the other hand, we bossed ourselves around, set impossible goals, and demanded longer hours than office jobs usually entail. It was the ultimate “flextime,” in that it depended on how flexible we felt each day, given deadlines, distractions, and workaholic crescendos.” ~Diane Ackerman, One Hundred Names for Love: A Stroke, A Marriage, and the Language of Healing, 2011

Working from home as a health management technique can work well – you just have to find the way that is most beneficial for you.

Namaste.

Carolyne

Stress, Swimming, Change and other Stuff

“Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.” ~Leo Tolstoy

I saw this picture online at the noted link, and it resonated with me in a very deep way. Why? Because of stress.

Stress, you question? Why would this picture move my mind to think of stress? It doesn’t – it reminds me that stress can become so “normal” that it can become a way of life that we don’t even recognize. It reminds me that there is more to life than stress – such as pure joy.

This picture reminds me that we need to always seek ways to let go of stress. For me – nature and water are typically stress reducers.

Stress isn’t always bad. In small doses, it can help us perform under pressure and motivate us to do our best. But for those of us with MS, symptoms can often be exacerbated by our own action or inaction in dealing with stress.

Personally, I seem to have a really bad habit of finding myself in situations of spiraling stress. Sometimes (too often, actually)  it takes a medical crash to make me wake up to the levels of stress with which i have been living. But I must say that as I get older and gain more experience with my personal MS course, I am slowly learning to start to recognize my stress levels sooner – and take mitigating action sooner where I can. I am learning to adapt and change.

This can be really tough when I am working full-time, trying to manage my MS symptoms, and trying to fulfill some goals. What I am learning now is to understand where the “stress line” for me – the line or edge that, if I go past it, will inevitably lead to a medical crash of some sort – whether it is seizures or multiple MS flare-ups. Often – the stress can be a product of my own making, truth be told. For example – when I take on too much at work, because I am trying to prove myself or ensure my professional value. I can end up cutting myself off at the knees because my body wears out, leading to a crash, and I don’t succeed as I expect. Or by trying to fulfill a goal such as swimming competitively in synchro with a team again, and pushing myself to reach my goal, even if it may not be the best fit.

The importance of being able to pull back, look at the bigger picture, see where the stressors are, and figuring out how to let go of the stressors that you can control…well, that is a special art, as far as I am concerned. And one that needs significant time to master! And I am in no way close to mastering this art myself, that is for sure! Though I am getting better at identifying the source of the stressors. Some I can control; some I can’t – it is situation dependent. The stress sources that I can control – well, I have to figure out how to lessen impacts on my health. That can take the form of pulling out of a project; adapting a routine, and/or removing oneself from toxic situations or people.

Finding the courage to follow through, however, can be a b@%ch, I can assure you! (This seems especially true of those of us who are over-achievers because we tend to not want to give things up easily!)

Obviously, we can’t get rid of stress completely. This is especially true  when you have a disease like MS - because the very nature of an unpredictable illness like MS means there is always a basic level of stress that will be present. The constant changes that can come with MS, such as not knowing from one day to the next what part of you may or may not be working as you expect, can create a constant low “stress buzz” that niggles at the back of your mind for various reasons. That’s why having a stress-mitigating tool – such as exercise, yoga, or meditation – becomes ever so important for us.

For me – those tools come in the forms of swimming, walking, yoga, crafts, and good friends. I can’t change everything – but I can change myself. I can adapt. I can let go of the stress…or at least some of it!

“If there is no struggle, there is no progress.” ~ Frederick Douglass

Namaste

Carolyne

Push through! Push through! You can do it.

Nothing can stop the man with the right mental attitude from achieving his goal; nothing on earth can help the man with the wrong mental attitude. ~ Thomas Jefferson

As many of you know, I manage my MS by maintaining a strong exercise program – which includes swimming, walking, and yoga. This daily exercise routine is necessary to manage my fatigue and pain levels. Too much lying around causes my leg pain to skyrocket, and makes me more fatigued and less mobile. Two days of inactivity can cause painful immobility – and I really don’t like it, so hence I maintain as high a level of physical activity as possible. Luckily, my earlier years as a synchronized swimmer, lifeguard team member, waterpolo player and weight training enthusiast have given me a “push through the pain” discipline and mentality that serves me well now when I need it for my own survival.

Even so, MS remains confusing to manage and pisses me off sometimes (ok – lots of times).  I can push myself very hard while swimming and maintain amazing cardio benefits as a result. I can do hot yoga and regulate my breathing and maintain flexibility. But push myself a bit hard on a warm sunny day? …that’s another story all together. Hubby and I hiked around the Dingle Tower park here in Halifax recently on a beautiful sunny summer day, then we climbed to the top of the historic tower. It is just a few stories high…straight up wrought iron stairways. No problem, right? I mean – I am fit, and have cardio benefits to burn, right? Well, I get to the top…and the world starts to go grey at the edges and I feel myself about to faint…so I drop immediately and spend 15 minutes on the floor to prevent a full-on faint. All this brought on by being overheated and my MS flaring up, saying: “Nope – don’t like it. I am gonna take you down.”

It made me angry to feel weak and vulnerable. It made me angry to feel “bested” by my own body – despite all my efforts to maintain a good balance. So – that stubborn streak came out yet again. Because I recognized what was happening, I was abe to prevent a full-on faint by resting at the top of the tower, allowing the breezes to cool me rapidly. Once I felt cooler and stronger, I got back up – and I climbed down those stairs on my own, shaky legs and all. And lucky hubby – he did not have to carry me down the tower stairs! Though he chivalrously walked in front of me so he could catch me if I fell. (That man is wonderful – and so patient with my stubbornness! )

To me – it is that “push through the pain” mentality that allows me to push the boundaries of my own body like that – beyond my MS; beyond my fear of having a seizure. I don’t like feeling held back – and I will try to do whatever I can to succeed at my goal. Do I always succeed? Heck, no – we all know that by now. But to me, trying is the most important part – it means I am alive and moving forward. Sheer stubbornness helps too!

Respect your efforts, respect yourself. Self-respect leads to self-discipline. When you have both firmly under your belt, that’s real power. ~ Clint Eastwood

Namaste

Carolyne

Me and my MS: Why I love the water and swimming

“Nothing is softer or more flexible than water, yet nothing can resist it.” ~ Lao Tzu

Carolyne coming up from the depths!

Carolyne coming up from the depths!

Water. H2O. Is there anything more beautiful and potentially terrifying at the same time?? The power of water (as can be seen in the floods we have seen here in Canada this year) is awe-inspiring. It can bring peace. It can destroy. It is a basic necessity of life.

In the summer, people often head to swimming pools, lakes, ocean beaches, rivers, kiddy pools, sprinklers…anything to be in or near water. We do this primarily to stay cool and get away from heat – MS or no MS. With excess heat, often comes irritability and  health distress of some form. With excess heat, those of us with MS often see flare ups of symptoms and severely increased fatigue levels – none of which is good.

Thank goodness for my ability to get in the water and swim, and feel comfortable, and feel cool. Whether I am upside down spinning in some wild synchronized swimming figure, or swimming flat out, or just floating…I am comfortably at peace with my environment.

In the water is the only place I feel no pain. When I am in the water, I feel like I am home.

When I say I feel no pain, I mean that gravity is no longer a factor in my pain. The movement in the water also helps take away the deep burning pain I chronically deal with in my legs.  Daily movement is what helps keep that pain manageable – but swimming helps give me a nearly complete break from it. (That is an emotional and mental bonus, in my books.) But in order to gain that benefit of feeling pain-free, I do have to push myself to feel the “pain” of hard exercise. I have to push my body to gain good cardio benefits and strength – and  that comes with the pain of the exertion, as in “No pain, no gain”.

I have been swimming again with my local Masters swim team…and marveling at the effects it has on me. While Synchro develops strength, grace, agility, and breath control, swim team develops more on the cardio and endurance levels. Gasp!!! The two combined, along with yoga, keep me physically balanced and increase my ability to manage pain. But I still sometimes overdo it – and I learn from it each time.

When one has MS, they have to learn to find the balance between “just enough” and “too much”, or risk the backlash of MS symptoms. I usually only know when I have pushed too much after the fact – such as when I end up deeply exhausted, in terrible burning pain,  and foggy brained for 2 days after a particularly hard training session. (That’s when gentle yoga and resting meditation is really critical!) Hindsight is always 20-20 though, eh? Finding that sweet spot between “just enough” and “too much” takes work – and often with MS, finding that sweet spot is never ending, because MS symtoms can flare and change so unpredictably. Do it anyway!

Allowing for Personal Renewal in 2013!

“I can hardly wait for tomorrow, it means a new life for me each and every day.” ~ Stanley Kunitz

Image Source: http://breastcancerpartner.com/blog/uncategorized/renewal-spring-is-here/

Image Source: breastcancerpartner.com/blog/

As 2012 came to an end, some sighed in relief that the world did not come to the prophetic end. Some did not have any clue that 2012 was supposedly an “end” to anything. Most of the world simply went on living life as usual.

Everyone has their own individual experience with the past year (2012) so I am not going to do any kind of run-down of 2012 events. We all can do that on a deeply personal level. Look back at 2012 and recognize the blessings there. Recognize the challenges and subsequent learning opportunities. Recognize the achievements and appreciate the moments of joy. Be grateful for what 2012 brought to your life, big or small. Then, let go of 2012 and move on to a sparkly shiny new 2013.

The year 2013 for me will be another year of change and goal setting. Here are a couple of my personal goals for 2013:

  1. Get into optimum training form. To do so, I will kick up my synchronized swimming training efforts a notch to make my goal of competing by  my 50th birthday in spring of 2014 a reality. (I have already begun this one by joining a local gym with my hubby and beginning a training regimen tailored to my injuries and medical adjustments and my goal of competing. This should complement my weekly synchro swim training sessions well! ) 
  2. Keep on top of my health management by ensuring I maintain a healthy diet and manage my fatigue properly. To do so, I will follow a healthy diet with as much raw foods as possible. I will not over-extend my energy limits to the point of exhaustion. I will schedule in more relaxation yoga and meditation.

The greatest mistake a man can make is to be afraid of making one. -Elbert Hubbard

The training goal is the tough one physically. While there is definitely excitement to be back in the water and training competitively in synchronized swimming, I battle frequently with a little niggling fear in the back of my mind that maybe, just maybe, I have bitten of more than I can chew this time. Little ghosts of thoughts cross my mind, such as: Will my body be able to handle this? Am I crazy? Am I too old? Am I too “disabled”? Does it stop me? Heck no. But it does keep me on my toes and AWARE of myself and my own qualms.

The first step towards getting somewhere is to decide that you are not going to stay where you are. -J. Pierpont Morgan

The health management goal is the toughest one. That’s the one where I have to really fight myself to keep…because I can so easily slide into bad eating habits or push myself to  work too much when I am over-tired. When I am fatigued is also when my brain does not seem to function at its best, and I have been known to make really weird decisions in terms of best choices at the times. (I believe my sister often uses the phrase “OMG – Do you need a brick to hit you in the head every time to get you to finally rest???” ) Trying to get a Type-A person to recognize when she is in full Type-A throttle and to scale back can be quite a challenge at the best of times!

So – do I expect to be perfect this year in reaching my goals and resolutions? Heck no. But I will have fun on the path!

OUR GREATEST GLORY IS NOT IN NEVER FAILING, BUT IN RISING EVERY TIME WE FALL. -CONFUCIUS

Have fun on your own 2013 journey!

Namaste.

Carolyne

Health Management still applies during the Festive Season

Health is the greatest gift, contentment the greatest wealth, faithfulness the best relationship. ~ Buddha

We are in the midst of the holiday season festivities. This is a happy, busy and tiring time for many. It can also be a lonely time for some. Both ends require efforts to management of health.

When dealing with a chronic illness, there a more challenges afoot: trying to maximize your ability to meet social and family commitments while minimizing the drain on your energy and any impact to your health. Impacts that come not just from the demands on time and energy, but also the changes in diet and drink consumption. (Those mince meat tarts of auntie’s are to die for…oh and the cookies, cakes, hor d’ouevres, tourtieres,…oh my! What do you mean this is not the way to eat every day? Oh…my head…how many glasses of wine did you say?)  We eat differently, don’t sleep the way we normally do, and push our bodies to meet social and family functions. While all this can be fun…we need to pace ourselves and keep our health management need very clearly in mind. Because pay back is a Bi**h!

In the old days, it was not called the Holiday Season; the Christians called it ‘Christmas’ and went to church; the Jews called it ‘Hanukka’ and went to synagogue; the atheists went to parties and drank. People passing each other on the street would say ‘Merry Christmas!’ or ‘Happy Hanukka!’ or (to the atheists) ‘Look out for the wall!’ ~ Dave Barry, Christmas Shopping

So, from me and mine to you and yours: Happy Holidays! Happy Hannuka! Happy whatever! (And look out for the wall…)

Oh – and congrats on surviving the end of the world prophecies! ;)

Namaste

Carolyne

What is the End of the World, anyway?

“Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple.”~ Dr. Seuss

Image Source:www.timeanddate.com/calendar/maya-world-end.html

Image Source:www.timeanddate.com/calendar/maya-world-end.html

So – what is the end of the world, anyway? What does the end of the world as we know it mean?

These questions have been flying around as the legendary end of the Mayan long-count calendar approaches, which falls (according to north american “experts”) on December 21, 2012.

Personally, I think the end of the world has come and gone many times over, and will come and go many times over in the future. I believe it is also highly personal. And I believe what can be the end of the world as we know can mean a brand new beginning and a new world to discover.

Just looking at this 2012 year exemplifies that for me.

A friend lost her child when a pre-natal check-up showed no heart beat – the world as she new it ended that day. Couples divorced, fighting bitter battles over child custody or money – the children’s worlds ended as they knew it. Someone gets officially diagnosed with a chronic illness like MS – the world ended as they knew it that day. A maniac kills innocent children and adults for some unknown and whacked-out reason – the world as the families of the victims ended as they know it that day. Militants, rebels, and corrupt governments fight endlessly, killing civilians and military personnel – the world as they and the people around them know it ended, repeatedly.

On the other side of the coin, there is a new beginning. But that new beginning is not necessarily always easy or painless. The person diagnosed with a disease starts a support group and sees a new beginning and a new life managing and coping. The results of the maniacal killing spree of a whacko spurs a new beginning for better and safer gun laws and restrictions. I married my best friend, lover, hero, and the most wonderful man I have ever met; that day the end of the word as I knew it occurred – and a brand knew world began for me.

As human being, we seem to always search for the “end of the world” somewhere. Do we really need to look for the end of the world in things we cannot control, big or small? I say “Stop”. Look a little bit closer to home…and appreciate what you have around you. Appreciate the little endings, the little beginnings – the world around you. Don’t try to control what you simply cannot. Don’t panic about things that have no basis in truth.

The world changes every single day. Be grateful for the world as YOU know it.

“In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life: it goes on.” ― Robert Frost

(See you on the other side of the End of the World. ;)

Namaste

Carolyne

It Takes a Team to Manage your Health

Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.  ~World Health Organization, 1948

One thing I have learned over the years is that the support of a team is essential for so many achievements in life, be it at work or at home. The same is very true for managing health if you live with chronic illness.

But what does that team look like? Well – it varies for every person. A team can be you and a family member. It can be small. It can be large. One large team…or teams within a team. It can consist of close contacts. It can consist of near strangers. What matters is that you feel supported by your team.

I consider myself very lucky, despite my health challenges. I have a fantastic support team. My support team includes my family, my colleagues, my medical healthcare team, my pets, my yoga community, and my new synchro swimming buds. One large team…with teams within a team.

Each member of what I call my support team helps me along my journey and in managing my health in his or her own way, at various times. (And yes – sometimes they don’t even know how much they may have helped me in one moment or another.) My husband cheers me on, and is there to catch me when I fall or when I just need someone to hold me and hug me and tell me it will all be ok. The rest of my family are also there to cheer me on and catch me when I fall – as are my closest friends. My boss allows me to work primarily from home so that I can keep working. I also am lucky enough to have developed good relationships and friendships with my medical support team – from my neurologists to my massage therapist, chiropractor, and osteopath. With my synchro team, I have a fantastic coach who supports my goals for competition and respects me enough to push me when she knows I need that pushing. My health history doesn’t scare her at all.

I am very appreciative of all of their contributions to how I manage my health. And I try to let them know that as often as I can.

And I appreciate you all – as my readers, you are also a part of my support team…so thank you!

Teamwork is the ability to work as a group toward a common vision, even if that vision becomes extremely blurry. ~Author Unknown

Who  makes up your support team?

Namaste

Carolyne

The Button and Identity

“An identity would seem to be arrived at by the way in which the person faces and uses his experience.” ~ James Baldwin

Can a chronic illness like MS affect your identity? You betcha! You see, personal identity (our sense of self) tends not to be an unchanging concrete thing. It tends more to be a dynamic concept that  fluctuates with life experience.

Our sense of self includes anything such as life/professional roles, personal attributes, behaviors, and aspects that we consider most important about ourselves. The aspects that contribute to our self identities can be things like occupation, hobbies, athletic ability, family relationships, marital status, disabilities and health…among many others.

My own identity can be shaken at times by the twists and turns of my health due to multiple sclerosis and seizures. And often, the symbol of that comes in the form of a button…a remote button I wear around my neck so that if I fall or drop due to a seizure, emergency personnel will be called and sent directly to me, even if I am unconscious. I have a love/hate relationship with that button. It is because of the button that I can be alone and maintain my independence. It is because of my health condition that I need the button – so when my health is at a lower ebb, and I have to wear and count on that button – it becomes a symbol of my dependence and a perception of freedoms lost.

In the last few weeks, as a result of the overwhelmingly busy schedule I have been keeping with workload, travel, wedding, moving, packing, unpacking, and so on… I have ended up dealing with a deeper MS exacerbation physically than I have in a while. My muscles are weaker than normal, exacerbating my spinal injury, triggering more weakness, and so on. As a result, in order to ensure my safety, it has been important for me to wear my button “just in case”. This “just in case” part is primarily because we don’t know if a seizure will be triggered or not. I end up feeling “less than” because I need to slow down. I know – it is not logical…but it happens sometimes. (That’s where a good support system helps!)

That’s where identity comes in, because when you can’t do what you are normally accustomed to do, it can affect your sense of self. Sometimes we can feel a sense of guilt for being unable to participate at a certain level. Or we can feel isolated. It is imperative to remember, at that time, that we are not just one thing (i.e. wht we do, or how we do it, or…). We need to ensure that we don’t allow what we can’t do in one moment to impact our sense of identity in any moment. And it can be easier said than done, depending on our own personal sense of self.

Every new adjustment is a crisis in self-esteem. ~ Eric Hoffer

Now where did I leave that darned button?

Namaste

Carolyne

Serenity in the Challenge and the Chaos

“Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all.” ― Helen Keller

Whew – life can get chaotic sometimes, can’t it? I think of my own life right now – talk about chaos! Sometimes I am exhausted just thinking about it: a new marriage; long-term things coming to a head at work; moving an entire household; taking on a new cause and awareness raising initiative; raising teenagers; and staying on top of my health management. Keeping balance through our chaotic times can be a challenge in itself.

Life can be full of challenges in periods of chaos. And – sometimes challenges can bring us adventure – and sometimes that very adventure brings us serenity and inner peace.

Even with all the “busy-ness”, I have been feeling more “me” than ever before in my life. Part of it is that I married my life partner, BFF, and soul mate. Part of it is that I am “able”, despite my health constraints. But a big part of it has been facing a huge challenge and taking a little slice of “me” back from the constraints of my chronic illness – in this case, by getting back into the water.

Synchronized swimming is back in my life – and, boy oh boy, did I ever miss it and hadn’t even realized it! I am a water baby at the core – always have been. I am never more relaxed mentally, spiritually, and emotionally than when I am in or near water. My personal challenge is to be fully active and even competing in the Masters Synchro world by my 50th birthday. That is not that far off. The biggest challenge was getting back in the water itself – knowing that a seizure in the water is a dangerous thing.

You see, I want to raise awareness for the Stigma against Seizure Disorders as I travel this journey I call my life. (Look for a facebook page down the road. Yup – more to keep me busy and challenged!) Raising awareness means being transparent to a large degree. That is, in and of itself, a challenge. It means disclosing (repeatedly) that I have a seizure disorder – but that I don’t let it stop me from living my life to its fullest potential. It means telling each lifeguard what I need them to watch for and do. It means making sure that my coach knows what my “deal” is – and making sure she is comfortable with it. It means facing the fear every day. It means working every day to keep motivated, no matter what.

But these very challenges are the fuel that fire my inner peace. Knowing I may help just one person by sharing my experiences fuels that fire, and brings me a sense of serenity. Knowing that I have the courage to face a fear and break the social assumptions by getting back into the water, despite all the warnings about the dangers – that brings me a sense of serenity and inner peace. (Being underwater in the cool blue – that alone brings me serenity.) That’s what works for me. That, currently, is my daring adventure!

Finding serenity and inner peace – that is a personal journey, and each individual defines that for themselves. Serenity and peace in the challenge and chaos – I firmly believe it can be found…if you allow yourself to see it and recognise it. What does it look like for you?

“The truth is that our finest moments are most likely to occur when we are feeling deeply uncomfortable, unhappy, or unfulfilled.  For it is only in such moments, propelled by our discomfort, that we are likely to step out of our ruts and start searching for different ways or truer answers.” ~ unknown

Namaste

Carolyne